BLS Says Flexible Arrangements Offered For More Than Half of Workers Last Year

With an emphasis on practical strategies to improve productivity and performance, and limit potential liabilities, Bulletin to Management™ concisely analyzes new developments in employment and human resources management.

Fifty-six 56 percent of wage and salary earners were able to adjust their work schedule or location instead of taking time off from their jobs in 2011, according to figures released Aug. 16 by the Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The report includes workers using flexible time or location arrangements instead of taking paid or unpaid leave, as well as those who did not have access to leave.

Flexible work arrangements were most commonly available to workers in the leisure and hospitality industry (71 percent), followed by those in information (69 percent) and wholesale and retail trade (66 percent).

In addition, private sector workers were more likely to have the ability to adjust their work schedules or locations (58 percent) than public employees (41 percent).

The data is based on responses from 6,673 workers ages 15 and older to a supplemental questionnaire included in the 2011 American Time Use Survey, concerning workers' access to paid and unpaid leave, reasons workers were able to take paid and/or unpaid leave, and whether and how workers could adjust their work schedules.

Last year was the first in which BLS tracked information on flexible arrangements and leave as part of the survey.

Text of the report is available at The accompanying tables show the data.