BOOK

Copyright Law Deskbook, with 2015 Cumulative Supplement

This handbook covers the most timely and significant aspects of copyright law in a concise, convenient format. Every chapter contains excerpts from the Copyright Act, explanations of the text, and analyses of seminal decisions, addressing fair use, work for hire, copyrightability, digital rights and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, international considerations, damages, formalities, preemption, and litigation issues.

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DESCRIPTION

A functional, “to-the-point” treatise covering current cases and pivotal decisions

Copyright Law Deskbook expertly addresses the law and practice of copyright, with a particular emphasis on, and analyses of, recent case law developments. This treatise is invaluable for its exploration of cases in which existing copyright content is being aggregated, adapted, and distributed in ways unforeseen by Congress when it passed the Copyright Act in 1976. The book offers the most up-to-date and significant aspects of the law, including fair use, work for hire, copyrightability, digital rights and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, international considerations, damages, formalities, preemption, and litigation issues. 


Supplement Information  

Major developments in the 2015 Cumulative Supplement include:

  • HathiTrust—the Second Circuit affirmed a finding that the electronic scanning of entire books was fair use, when carried out to make the works text-searchable or to make them accessible to the visually impaired
  • Patton—a divided Eleventh Circuit largely upheld a ruling the unauthorized use of “e-reserves,” i.e., electronic copies of reading material for college courses, was fair use
  • Copyrightability: Garcia v. Google—the Ninth Circuit’s en banc 2015 ruling that reversed a controversial 2014 panel decision to hold that an actress could have no copyright in her on-screen performance
  • Public Performance: Fox v. Dish—the Ninth Circuit distinguished Dish’s “hopper” technology from the multiple-antenna internet-TV service enjoined in 2014 by the Supreme Court in Aereo 
  • Flo & Eddie v. Sirius—District courts in California and New York held that pre-1972 sound recordings should have common-law public performance rights equivalent to the statutory rights enjoyed by post-1972 recordings under the Copyright Act
  • Substantial Similarity: Williams v. Bridgeport Music—a California jury held that Robin Thicke’s 2013 hit song “Blurred Lines” was an infringement of Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit “Got to Give It Up,” even after the judge ruled that the jury could not hear the Gaye recording at trial


AUTHOR

Bloomberg BNA authors and editors are practicing professionals with insider perspectives and real-life experience. Learn more about this book’s authors and editors.
Robert W. Clarida is a partner at Reitler, Kailas & Rosenblatt, LLC in New York, N.Y., and a noted author and speaker on copyright. He is a past trustee of the Copyright Society of the USA and a past member of the Board of Directors of the American Intellectual Property Law Association.

CONTENTS

View full tables of contents and read the book’s preface or introduction.