Donald Trump

In response to the final question he faced before the Washington Post’s editorial board yesterday, Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump said he was “not a believer” that human activity is the main driver of climate change.

“Perhaps there’s a minor effect, but I’m not a big believer in man-made climate change,” Trump said.

Stephen Stromberg, editorial writer for the Washington Post, then followed up by asking “don’t good businessmen hedge against risks, not ignore them?”

Trump, who many believe would be a “complete wild card” for the environment if elected president,  replied that “we have much bigger risks” than climate change, naming the threat of nuclear weapons as the No. 1 risk to the U.S.

Here’s the transcript of the exchange, via a transcript released by the Washington Post.

Washington Post: You think climate change is a real thing? Is there human-caused climate change?

Trump: I think there’s a change in weather. I am not a great believer in man-made climate change. I’m not a great believer. There is certainly a change in weather that goes – if you look, they had global cooling in the 1920s and now they have global warming, although now they don’t know if they have global warming. They call it all sorts of different things; now they’re using “extreme weather” I guess more than any other phrase. I am not – I know it hurts me with this room, and I know it’s probably a killer with this room – but I am not a believer. Perhaps there’s a minor effect, but I’m not a big believer in man-made climate change.

Washington Post: Don’t good businessmen hedge against risks, not ignore them?

Trump: Well I just think we have much bigger risks. I mean I think we have militarily tremendous risks. I think we’re in tremendous peril. I think our biggest form of climate change we should worry about is nuclear weapons. The biggest risk to the world, to me – I know President Obama thought it was climate change – to me the biggest risk is nuclear weapons. That’s – that is climate change. That is a disaster, and we don’t even know where the nuclear weapons are right now. We don’t know who has them. We don’t know who’s trying to get them. The biggest risk for this world and this country is nuclear weapons, the power of nuclear weapons.