While Congress takes its Fourth of July recess the week of June 30, NASA is scheduled to launch its first satellite dedicated to measuring carbon dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere July 1.

As featured in this June 12 Energy and Climate Report article, the $465 million Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission seeks to provide a more complete picture of human and natural sources of carbon dioxide globally as well as sinks where carbon dioxide is absorbed.

The NASA satellite, which will replace a nearly identical spacecraft lost in a rocket launch failure in 2009, will be launched from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

Florida Counties to Release Report

In Florida, the counties of Miami and Dade are expected to release a report July 1 on the risk of sea-level rise.

As covered in this April 22 article on a field hearing organized by Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.), county officials said sea-level rise, storm surge and other climate change impacts could put billions of dollars worth of coastal properties and tourism activities in South Florida at risk.

At the hearing, Nelson called Florida “ground zero” for sea-level rise. The state has already seen between 5 and 8 inches of sea-level rise, he said.

According to research by the Florida Atlantic University, another 3 to 9 inches of sea-level rise by 2050 could destroy the majority of the coastal structures that protect Southeast Florida from flooding and saltwater intrusion. 

Other Climate, Energy Events

The Department of Energy will host a webinar July 1 on "Better Buildings Case CompetitionSatisfying Renewable Portfolio Standards With Solar: A Case Study."

The Alliance to Save Energy will hold a briefing July 1 in Washington on "Perspectives on Energy Efficiency Financing." Speakers include Jeff Eckel, president and CEO of Hannon Armstrong; Vic Rojas, senior manager for financial policy at the Environmental Defense Fund; and Ian Fischer, program manager for DC PACE.


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