BYE BYE BUDGET? CONGRESS VOTES TO CAN DELIVERY OF PRESIDENT’S VOLUMINOUS BLUEPRINT

The arrival of the president’s budget on Capitol Hill every February is marked by the distribution of three fat documents to every congressional office laying out, in exhaustive detail, the proposed funding for agencies and programs across the government.

The 170-page Budget, the 400-page Analytical Perspectives and 1,400-page Appendix, are fixtures in the office of members and committees, where they stand as a ready resource for aides to dig into the minutiae of agency budgets.

It's heavy

The arrival of the president’s budget on Capitol Hill every February is marked by the distribution of three fat documents to every congressional office laying out, in exhaustive detail, the proposed funding for agencies and programs across the government.

The 170-page Budget, the 400-page Analytical Perspectives and 1,400-page Appendix, are fixtures in the office of members and committees, where they stand as a ready resource for aides to dig into the minutiae of agency budgets.

But the familiar documents are about to disappear if a provision tucked into a recently passed House bill to fund congressional operations survives a year-end negotiation with the Senate.

Rep. Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.) wants to stop the delivery of the budget papers to congressional offices, and added the provision to the annual legislative branch appropriations bill to fund House operations.

The various documents “are all available on an app for your phone for free,” Gosar said. “Furthermore, all three are available in their entirety online at www.whitehouse.gov/omb/ where they are more easily searchable.”

“The printing and distribution of the president’s budget to 435 House offices is excessive,” he said before his amendment was approved on voice vote.

Gosar said he is “the first to admit” that the provision won’t save millions of dollars. But he suggested that the plan reflects Republican disinterest in the budget. This year, House leaders refused to even invite the White House Office of Management and Budget to testify on the president’s submission, another time-honored tradition.

“In a time when our nation is facing a fiscal crisis and has a $19 trillion-plus debt as a result of excessive and unnecessary spending, we should not be squandering more money printing nearly 2,000 pages of the president’s budget that most members throw in the trash, recycle or don’t even open,” Gosar said.

Budget documents in trash