William M. Hannay Esq.

Schiff Hardin LLP
Hannay, William

William M. Hannay is a Partner in the Chicago office of Schiff Hardin LLP where he regularly represents corporations and individuals in civil and criminal matters, involving federal and state antitrust law, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), foreign direct investments (including Exon-Florio), antiboycott laws, and export control regulations. On behalf of Schiff Hardin clients, he has conducted non-public internal investigations, and represented clients in external investigations by U.S. and foreign enforcement agencies.

Mr. Hannay is the past Chairman of the American Bar Association's (ABA) 14,000-member Section of International Law, was a founding member of the ABA's Asia Law Initiative Council, and was the first chairman of the ABA's Africa Law Initiative Council. He has led delegations of American Bar Association lawyers on international legal exchanges to South Africa, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Ghana, the Ivory Coast and Morocco.  He is a former Assistant District Attorney in the New York District Attorney's Office.  Mr. Hannay clerked for the Honorable Myron H. Bright of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit and Justice Tom C. Clark of the U.S. Supreme Court.  He earned his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center.

Mr. Hannay is the author of Bloomberg BNA Corporate Practice Portfolio Series No. 39-3rd, Tying Arrangements: Practice Under Federal Antitrust, Patent and Banking Law.  This portfolio volume explains the requirements necessary to prove that an illegal tie exists and sets out the defenses that may justify a tie in particular situations under §1 of the Sherman Act and §3 of the Clayton Act. The Bank Holding Company Act and the Home Owners' Loan Act—the sources of a significant volume of litigation in this area—are also given extensive consideration. The portfolio points out the recurring problem areas in the tying field and offers suggestions to help corporate counsel navigate their way clear of obstacles.  He is also the author of Bloomberg BNA Corporate Practice Portfolio Series No. 53-3rd, U.S. International Antitrust Enforcement: A Practical Guide.  This portfolio volume seeks to provide practical advice on both substantive aspects of U.S. international antitrust enforcement as well as the procedural aspects, the latter of which is often outcome determinative and sets traps for the unwary.  This portfolio is divided into two parts: Part One addresses U.S. enforcement policy in substantive antitrust areas, and Part Two deals with procedural aspects of international antitrust enforcement.