Tax Questions With New Hampshire Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Chris Sununu

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Tax Policy

Bloomberg BNA recently posed a series of tax-centric questions to the Republican and Democrat candidates for governor in New Hampshire. Below are the responses from Republican candidate Chris Sununu.

Chris Sununu

Interview by Adrianne Appel

Raised in Salem, Chris graduated from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) with a B.S. in Civil/Environmental Engineering and worked for ten years cleaning up hazardous waste sites across the country. In 2010, Chris led a team of local investors to buy back New Hampshire's Waterville Valley Resort, where he currently serves as CEO. Chris is serving in his third term on the New Hampshire Executive Council. He and his wife Valerie live in Newfields and have three children, Calvin, Edie, and Leo.

Bloomberg BNA:

What existing state and local tax measures or initiatives would you seek to support? Or curb?

Sununu:

As governor, I'd support extending reductions to the business enterprise tax and business profits tax to provide business owners more flexibility to grow and hire. I will always oppose a sales and income tax.

Bloomberg BNA:

What is the biggest hurdle you foresee to enacting your major tax-related initiatives?

Sununu:

Democrats are my biggest hurdle, because too many still do not understand that by lowering taxes, reducing regulations and controlling health care costs, we can create a more business-friendly environment and ultimate growth in state revenue.

Bloomberg BNA:

What is the biggest challenge you see facing New Hampshire from a tax and revenue perspective, in light of current and evolving market conditions?

Sununu:

For nearly two decades, we've seen a gradual erosion of the New Hampshire advantage. To begin to grow our economy and once again become the job engine of New England, we must restore that New Hampshire tradition of a low tax burden and minimal business regulations.

Bloomberg BNA:

Do you believe New Hampshire has the right balance right now in terms of overall taxes? Does anything need to be re-balanced?

Sununu:

I believe we need to do more to reduce the tax burden on businesses. Our current tax structure has restricted needed growth and has served as a deterrent from attracting new businesses into the state.

To contact the reporter on this story: Adrianne Appel in Boston at aappel@bna.com

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Ryan C. Tuck at rtuck@bna.com

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