Trump Must Renominate Labor Department Picks

From labor disputes cases to labor and employment publications, for your research, you’ll find solutions on Bloomberg Law®. Protect your clients by developing strategies based on Litigation...

By Tyrone Richardson

President Donald Trump has to renominate several of his Labor Department nominees who didn’t get confirmed by the Senate at the close of the year’s session.

Senate rules require the president to restart the process for nominees who didn’t get a Senate vote by the end of the year. That means renominating Trump’s picks for open posts and restarting the committee vetting process before those nominees can move forward to the Senate for a full-floor vote.

Trump will have to renominate Patrick Pizzella for DOL deputy secretary; Scott Mugno for DOL assistant secretary, Occupational Safety and Health Administration; William Beach for Bureau of Labor Statistics commissioner; and Cheryl Stanton for Wage & Hour Division administrator.

The Senate on Dec. 21 confirmed a slew of nominations, including that of Kate O’Scannlain for labor solicitor and Preston Rutledge to head the Employee Benefits Security Administration. Lawmakers then left for the holiday recess.

The minority party can bypass the restart requirement for pending nominees by agreeing to waive them into the next session, which starts Jan. 3. Democrats have agreed to carry over Trump’s nominees for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: Chai Feldblum and Daniel Gade as commissioners and Janet Dhillon as chairwoman.

A spokesman for Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) didn’t immediately respond to Bloomberg Law’s request for comment Dec. 22. A White House spokesman wasn’t immediately available for comment Dec. 22.

To contact the reporter on this story: Tyrone Richardson in Washington at trichardson@bloomberglaw.com

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Chris Opfer at copfer@bloomberglaw.com

Copyright © 2017 The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Request Labor & Employment on Bloomberg Law